Why Aren’t We Sunni?

Some people ask us when we are Sunnis why do we invite abuse by calling ourselves Lahori-Ahmadi Muslims. We are not Sunnis and in this speech we explain how our beliefs differ on many points from the Sunnis.

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Who came by night and why?

In this khutba we will be looking at Chapter 86 of The Holy Quran, verses one to three.

Allah seeks of a person who comes by night. Who is this person and what is the point of his coming? These are are the questions we try and answer by looking at these verses.

Why I don’t believe people who say they loathe Islam but not Muslims

By Andrew Brown
This article first appeared in The Guardian

It is a trope among people who loathe and fear Islam that their fear and loathing has nothing in common with racism because Islam is not a race, the implication being that hating Muslims is rational and wise whereas hating black people is deeply irrational and stupid.

Some people who claim that Islam is profoundly evil will also say that they bear Muslims no ill will but I don’t think they are telling the truth. It is really difficult and indeed psychologically unnatural to claim that you hate an ideology without hating the people in whose lives it is expressed. Religions, nations, and even races are all shared imaginative constructs (although nations and races have other characteristics as well) and if you really want to extirpate them, you must extirpate the people who imagine them as well.

I remember George W Bush explaining that we were not going to war with the Iraqi people, but with the Iraqi government. Since then, something like a million of the Iraqi people have died as a result of our not going to war with them. The distinction is no doubt a great comfort to their surviving relatives but it’s not very useful for predictive purposes.

Racial and religious hatreds have one thing in common: they are not inspired by the race or religion of the hater, but by the religion or race of the victim. This is clearest in the case of antisemitism, which can appear as either a racial or a religious hatred, or indeed both. What’s constant is that it involves hating Jewish people, whatever the reasons given. Similarly, if you hate black people, you hate them on racist grounds whatever the colour of your own skin, and if you hate Muslims, Catholics, Quakers or Mormons, you hate them for their religion – whatever your own beliefs. So it is perfectly possible for religious hatred to be motivated by atheism and it may be quite common in the modern world.

The claim that Islam isn’t a race and so it is entirely rational to hate and fear it gains its moral force from the implicit claim that there is something uniquely horrible about racial hatred. I don’t think there is, though I see why we assume it: 50 or 60 years ago racial prejudice was an entirely natural part of English life. In order to change that, it was necessary to mark it as a uniquely dreadful and disfiguring condition: racism became a kind of moral leprosy. Without in any way wishing to roll back that progress, it’s worth noting that in other societies and at other times racial prejudice has not been the most urgent incitement to communal hatred.

But if we allow that the crimes of Stalin, or of Mao, were comparable to those of the transatlantic slave trade in ambition if not in duration, they are not excused in the slightest by saying that the most terrible atheist dictators were not very racist at all.

Stalin and Mao would have enthusiastically endorsed Sam Harris when he wrote that “there are some beliefs so terrible that we are justified in killing people just for holding them”, just as they would have endorsed his defence of torturing prisoners.

In the end, the position of people who claim that hatred of Islam is somehow superior to hatred of black people is pretty much like Alan Partridge boasting that at least he’s not David Brent.

Why has Allah banned gambling

Games of chance and intoxicants are banned in Islam, but why?

Verses 2:129 and 5:90 and 91 are quoted to show that the Holy Quran gives a balanced view of the reasons for forbidding intoxicants and games of chance – both have some good but their harm is greater than the good they do. In the UK while Weatherspoons, a company that operates ‘pubs’, places where intoxicants are supplied, announces a 37% increase in profits, medical research is published to show the detrimental affect that consumption of intoxicants has on the foetus.

The question about why everyone should be forbidden to consume intoxicants while harm is done to only a few is also answered.

Not able to watch the video? Then you can listen to the podcast below.

[Video] Why Ahmadiyyat is a necessity?

In a TV programme which a a law based drama shown on BBC a Muslim was questioned about what he does if his wife displeases him. He said he treats her in accordance with Islamic law.

He was then asked if he meant that “he has a quiet word with her, then if that doesn’t work, withdraws his sexual favours and even if that does not work then gives her a light beating”. He replied “yes”. It is true that this was a fiction but the statement quoted above is the general Muslim belief and public perception of Islam.

It was to correct such ideas that the Promised Messiah arose and so long as such misconceptions exist so will the need for the Ahmadiyya Movement.

Why Catholics could learn a lot from Islam

…”So in the Catholic tradition the idea of giving something up on a Friday – the act of self denial – has always been tied with being generous to those in need.”

Ramadan, a whole month of fasting and giving to the poor, recently ended for Muslims. Is that something Christians could do more to emulate?

“You’re right to point to the Muslim community,” Nichols replies. “What many of our bishops say is that young people today – who are much more exposed and sensitive to the Muslim practice of fasting – are ready for a challenge and want a challenge by which they can be identified.” It is those youngsters who have faith that will be the lifeblood of the Church if it is to survive the ever growing secularisation of our society.

“In many ways the young are more religiously minded than the older generations,” he says. “I think it’s the flip side of an age of individualism. Youngsters are not afraid to tell you what they think, to express their faith and be quite exuberant about it. We were much more reticent and probably a bit more troubled by issues of conformity than they are.”

Original article