French official threatens lawsuits over internet photos of police

From Engadget.com;

Unfortunately, it’s all too clear that some government officials just don’t understand how the internet works. After police in Nice, France were shamed online for forcing Muslim women to remove burkinis and other tradition-honoring apparel at the beach, deputy mayor Christian Estrosi announced that the city would sue people who post photos of police taking action against those women. That’s right — your Twitter post showing police officers doing their job (in a non-threatening situation, no less) could land you in court. These pictures “denigrate” the force and put officers in danger, Estrosi claims.

Rather than the pictures denigrating the Police perhaps it is the law in France, which empowers these armed policemen to force women to take their clothes off in public, that is the problem.

MI5 stopped Scotland Yard taking Choudary down

From The Telegraph;

The security services repeatedly prevented Scotland Yard from pursuing criminal investigations against hate preacher Anjem Choudary, it has been claimed.

 

Met counter-terror officers often felt they enough evidence to build a case against the radicalising cleric, only to be told to hang fire by MI5, because he was crucial to one of their on-going investigations, a source has claimed.

 

The situation led to tension between the two sides with police feeling “frustrated” that Choudary was not being brought to justice, the source added.

The ‘Islamic communities’, in the UK, have long been blamed for not stopping this man, but the reality seems to be that this media darling was being ‘protected’ by Government agencies who were trying to play a long game with him whilst Muslims bore the brunt of his horrific words in the form of rampant Islamophobia.

Anti-terror police question schoolboy for wearing pro-Palestine badge

Teenager referred by his teachers after trying to raise money to help Palestinian children

From Matt Broomfield in the Independent;

A schoolboy has been questioned by anti-terrorism police because he wore a “Free Palestine” badge to school.

Rahmaan Mohammadi’s teachers at Challney High School for Boys in Luton referred him to police under Prevent – the >controversial government anti-radicalisation programme, which critics have claimed is heavy-handed, discriminatory >and ineffective.

As well as wearing pro-Palestine badges and wristbands, Mohammadi was in possession of a leaflet advocating >Palestinian rights by pressure group Friends of al-Aqsa. He had also asked for permission to fundraise for children >affected by the Israeli occupation.

Questioned by Police for trying to raise money to help save the lives of little children? Whilst the Police were following procedure having received a report under the Prevent scheme, this seems a gross overstep by the teachers and administrative staff at Challney High School for Boys.

Internal police statistics obtained via a Freedom of Information request suggest only 20% of people referred to >Prevent are assessed as at risk of radicalisation.

Action should be taken against the teachers to stop frivolous reporting in the future, but as the statistics above show the mentality of gather up everyone and hope for the best is the one that prevails under the Prevent Programme.

Police Raid on a Berlin Mosque

Some UK news media have carried a news item stating that ‘Berlin Mosque’ has been raided by the German police searching for terrorists.

The name ‘Berlin Mosque’ is synanomous with the first mosque to be built on the continent. The headquarters of this organisation, now located in Lahore in Pakisan, built this mosque in 1924. Throughout its existence the Berlin Mosque has preached peaceful co-existence.

The news item itself contained the name of the area where the mosque that was raided is located and the name of its imam. However, the heading creates the impression that it is ‘The Berlin Mosque’ which was raided by the police as opposed to a mosque in Berlin.

Shahid Aziz, President of the UK branch of the worldwide Ahmadiyya Associations for propagation of Islam, said:-

It is essential that at this time when the name of our peaceful religion is associated with every violent act, we make clear to the media in the UK that it is not the mosque belonging to this organisation that has, or even suspected of having, any links with a terrorist organisation. We abhore and denounce all acts of violence and believe that the future lies in peaceful co-existence and dialogue. We request the media to bring this to the attention

Presumed Guilty

Remember the Birmingham Six, the Maguire Seven, the Guildford Four and Judith Ward? Behind the campaigning numbers were 18 innocent people who collectively spent scores of years in British jails after being falsely convicted of terrorism offences.

Their sin was to be Irish (or, in Ward’s case, to have spent time in Ireland) during that 1970s period when the Provisional IRA was bombing targets in the UK.

The police, convinced in each case that the 18 were guilty, extracted confessions under torture and/or intimidation, faked evidence and lied in court.

All of this is known, but all of this is too easily forgotten. Now, amid the hue and cry in Britain over the activities of the Islamic State (Isis), it is timely to recall the “mistakes” by the police, by MI5 and by a compliant media, of 40 years ago.

I couldn’t help but notice the triumphant and incautious tone in some newspapers last week when five men, aged 20 to 21, were arrested in London over “a suspected terrorist plot to mount an attack in Britain”.

We learned from some papers last Wednesday (8 October) that they had links to Syria and to Islamic State (Isis). The headlines were unequivocal: “Jihadi plot to attack UK smashed” (Daily Mail); “MI5 smash British ‘Isil terror plot'” (Daily Telegraph); “British medical student arrested on terror charges ‘may have just returned from Somalia'” (the Independent); and “MI5 nab surgeon” (The Sun).

The leaking to the press of such specific information, about Muslims being arrested, by the Police is extremely worrying, and is a repeat of how the Irish were treated not too long ago. But rather than learn from those harsh lessons the Police seem adamant on repeating them.

The criminal justice system in England and Wales has a long standing principle that people are presumed innocent, it is a part of the Human Rights act in both the UK and EU.

But as this Guardian article suggests, here in the UK if you are a Muslim you are presumed guilty and have to prove your innocence.

Police tear down minarets on Ahmadi Mosque

The police approached the community on Friday after a local cleric complained that three worship places for Ahmadis had features that resembled mosques, namely minarets and verses from the Quran written on the walls.

The minarets and verses were covered up, apparently to the police’s satisfaction, but a baying mob gathered at one worship place the next day and demanded that the minarets be torn down. The police did so. The group of protesters is now demanding that similar action be taken against two other worship places within a couple of days.

Persecution of Ahmadis in the name of Islam continues. September 7, the day of shame for Sunnis, is used to stir up mobs against the Ahmadiyya Movement and its holy founder Hazrat Mirza Ghulam Ahmad. All manner of falsehood is propagated against Ahmadis without there being any opportunity to respond. The fact that in South Africa twice and in England once the courts of law have accepted Ahmadis as Muslims. This is the real face of Sunni Islam and sharia that they want to impose on the United Kingdom

Police face court over refusal to hand over reports on anti-Muslim ‘bias’

Originally written by Vikram Dodd

From The Guardian

Scotland Yard is facing court action next week after refusing to hand over the results of investigations it was ordered to conduct into claims that it used counter-terrorism powers to discriminate against and harass innocent Muslims.

The Independent Police Complaints Commission (IPCC) is seeking a high court order against the refusal, which it says amounts to a clear breach of the law.

The IPCC ordered the investigations following complaints from Muslim Britons alleging police discrimination in the use of schedule 7 of the Terrorism Act, 2000, which allows stops at airports and ports, even if wrongdoing is not suspected.

Muslims are disproportionately targeted but the police deny they use ethnic or religious profiling. Scotland Yard is the only police force refusing to tell the IPCC the result of its investigation, the watchdog said. Schedule 7 was also used last month to detain, question and search David Miranda, the partner of the Guardian journalist Glenn Greenwald, who has revealed mass surveillance programmes by the US National Security Agency. The Met said it is considering the IPCC’s action. Continue reading

Anti-Ahmedi laws: Police act as worship place ‘looks like a mosque’


Policemen scratched out Quranic verses written on the walls of an Ahmedi place of worship and ordered them to cover up short minarets at the entrance as they made the place look like a mosque, The Express Tribune has learnt.

After receiving a complaint about the place of worship in Sultanpura, Kachhupura, a large contingent of Misri Shah police visited it on Wednesday and told the Ahmedis they had a day to make the place look less like a mosque, failing which a case would be registered against them under the ‘Anti-lslamic Activities of Qadiani Group, Lahori Group and Ahmadis (Prohibition and Punishment) Ordinance’ of 1984.

The policemen etched out the verses at the main gate and entrance to the main hall. They were about to tear down the minarets, about five feet high, at the main gate too, but local Ahmedis convinced them to give them a day to cover them as demolishing them would have damaged the whole structure. Continue reading