Does Islam Hate America?

In his interview with CNN Mr Trump tells the audience that ‘Islam hates them’. When asked is it the religion of Islam that teaches hatred, he did not answer.

So what is the truth? Does Islam hate America? Is Donald Trump right? Let us see what the Holy Quran has to say on the subject.

If you are not able to watch the video above due to bandwidth or restrictions etc then please enjoy the podcast of the speech below;

Burn Ferguson Burn

This is a new approach to Islamic teaching which traditionally suggests that the Holy Quran is for Muslims only

This radical departure from this approach suggests that everyone can benefit from the guidance of the Holy Quran if they look at its teachings as being aimed at humanity regardless of people’s beliefs. We look at one verse of the Holy Quran which is relevant to the treatment of African Americans by the white people.

If you are not able to watch the video, then you can listen to the podcast below;

Why so many Latinos are becoming Muslims

Just as the U.S. Latino population is on the rise – Hispanics are now the nation’s largest minority – so is the number of Latino Muslims. And it’s not just a result of Arab Latin Americans emigrating to the United States.

According to organizations like WhyIslam.org, Latinos are one of the fastest growing segments of the Muslim community. About six percent of U.S. Muslims are now Latino – and as many as a fifth of new converts to Islam nationwide are Latino.

The American Muslim Association of North America, based in North Miami, says heavily Hispanic South Florida in particular is home to a rising number of Latino Muslims.

This article is a typical example that shows exactly why the West regards Islam as a threat. The reason is  very simple. When people properly study Islam they embrace it and as the number of such people increases in the West, negative propaganda increases that it is a threat.

Original Source: AimIslam.com

Death by drone is swift and efficient – it’s also murder

I took the Letters page of this newspaper to confirm my instinctive reaction when I heard that the US government had assassinated Anwar al-Awlaki, a leading figure in al-Qa’ida, in Yemen. The Americans had sent two Predator drones to the area. They fired Hellfire missiles at a vehicle containing Awlaki and three other suspected al-Qa’ida members. The drone operator was probably working at an air force base in the US, most likely in Nevada. I picture him or her later driving home after a busy day in the office.

On our Letters page, Patricia Sheerin wrote that she searched our coverage in vain for just a few words condemning “yet another cowardly assassination”. Roger Jones lamented that “when we see the President of the United States calling a press conference for the second time in a matter of weeks to boast about having committed murder, it’s hard not to wonder whether the words moral compass still have any meaning at all in his unhappy country”. In fact the media as a whole was largely silent on the moral issues. Why was this?

Perhaps because the US has been conducting drone strikes on individuals since 2004. Reported drone strikes in north-west Pakistan by the US, for instance, including 60 so far in 2011 alone, have killed thousands of individuals in seven years, of whom many, but not all, were described as militants. The New America Foundation in Washington has collated these figures. But north-west Pakistan is akin to a war zone because of its porous frontier with Afghanistan, whereas Yemen is not. So a second reason for the lack of adverse comment must be that Awlaki was, by all accounts, a bad man.

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[Video] Islam and Terrorism

The world seems to have double standards; those which apply to Muslims and those which apply to the rest. If US drone attacks kill the innocent in Pakistan it is collateral damage but if a Muslim bomb kills innocent people it is terrorism. Can someone explain to us why? It is the hypocrisy of this approach that angers Muslims. All they ask for is a level playing field.

Condemn those who critise America after 9/11

Early on Sunday morning, as the rest of NYTimes.com was turned over to 9/11 anniversary, Paul Krugman vented his spleen. Years of columns were condensed into a few pithy lines. “What happened after 9/11 — and I think even people on the right know this, whether they admit it or not — was deeply shameful,” he wrote. “The atrocity should have been a unifying event, but instead it became a wedge issue. Fake heroes like Bernie Kerik, Rudy Giuliani, and, yes, George W. Bush raced to cash in on the horror. And then the attack was used to justify an unrelated war the neocons wanted to fight, for all the wrong reasons.”

These were sentiments he’d expressed before, but he knew they’d set people off. He turned off the comment section. “I didn’t have time to sift through the predictable vast pile of obscene and threatening stuff looking for the rare entries that were fit to print,” Krugman says. So the reaction occurred away from the blog, on Twitter and in other columns. Jennifer Rubin accused him of “hatred and contempt for his countrymen.” Donald Rumsfeld picked up the essential tool of the angry op-ed reader:

On a day when everyone else was flashing back to 9/11/2001, I was flashing back to the days and months later, when criticism of the Bush administration returned, and the practioners of it became, briefly, Emmanuel Goldsteins. Remember Susan Sontag? Remember the Dixie Chicks? Remember the campaign to “revoke the Oscar” from Michael Moore? There hasn’t been much criticism of the substance of Krugman’s remarks; denying that 9/11 and counterterrorism strategy became “wedge issues” is denying a few years of political history. The criticism is of Krugman for expressing it. He brushes the criticism right off.

“I’m not saying anything in that post that I wasn’t saying back in 2002, when people like him were riding high,” says Krugman. “And isn’t Rumsfeld ‘sweep everything up, related and not’ the poster child for 9/11 exploitation?”

Original article

Thomas Jefferson’s Iftar

“Ramadan,” said President Obama at a White House iftar dinner in 2010, “is a reminder that Islam has always been a part of America. The first Muslim ambassador to the United States, from Tunisia, was hosted by President Jefferson, who arranged a sunset dinner for his guest because it was Ramadan — making it the first known iftar at the White House, more than 200 years ago.” Click read more to continue Continue reading

Now we know. America really doesn’t care about injustice in the Middle East

middle east

It’s not that US diplomats don’t understand the Middle East; it’s just that they’ve lost all sight of injustice. Vast amounts of diplomatic literature prove that the mainstay of Washington’s Middle East policy is alignment with Israel, that its principal aim is to encourage the Arabs to join the American-Israeli alliance against Iran, that the compass point of US policy over years and years is the need to tame/bully/crush/oppress/ ultimately destroy the power of Iran.

There is virtually no talk (so far, at least) of illegal Jewish colonial settlements on the West Bank, of Israeli “outposts”, of extremist Israeli “settlers” whose homes now smallpox the occupied Palestinian West Bank – of the vast illegal system of land theft which lies at the heart of the Israeli-Palestinian war. And incredibly, all kinds of worthy US diplomats grovel and kneel before Israel’s demands – many of them apparently fervent supporters of Israel – as Mossad bosses and Israel military intelligence agents read their wish-list to their benefactors.
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Freedom in the West?

Freedom

We are told much about freedom in the West. Everyone is free to preach, practise and propagate their religion. Sadly, the reality is so different. In Switzerland, mosques cannot have minarets, in France women’s hijab is forcibly removed and the in the US, the bastion of the Western Values . . . read below

Religious Land Use Protection and Mosques

How Ahmadiyya Muslims Influenced Early Islam in America

The speaker in this video traces the impact that the Lahore Ahmadiyya Movement had in the propagation of Islam in the US. However, she is wrong in stating that Muhammad Abdullah was the first missionary sent by the Anjuman to Fiji. The first missionary was Mirza Muzaffar Baig who set up a branch of the Ahmadiyya Anjuman in Fiji. Maulana Muhammad Abdullah went to Fiji some years after this.

Islamophobia

Across America today, we are seeing an increase in fear and suspicion of people of Muslim faith. Rev. Deborah Lindsay reflects on the urgent need for understanding and peace-making, and she says a true Christian message is one of respect and understanding for all people of all faiths and traditions. After all, we are ALL created in the image of God.